What are some of the best hikes to take in Vancouver this summer to get my body moving? 

Q30:

Summer weather is finally here and now is the perfect time to start planning some day hikes in our beautiful province. Team Treloar makes an effort to get out and do a solid hike all throughout the summer months, as they offer such a great way to get outdoors, appreciate our amazing backyard, all while simultaneously being able to get an incredible workout. The best part about some of these hikes mentioned below is that even in the winter, they can be done with a good pair of boots, skies or snowshoes! 

All of these hikes are within 1-2 hours driving distance from Vancouver and they can be completed in a single day or less.  From sharp, intense landscape to casual and rolling terrain, these hikes offer exceptional views that you are guaranteed to enjoy! 

1. Lynn Peak

One of the North Shore’s best-kept secrets is Lynn Peak located within Lynn Valley. The trail to Lynn peak is a challenging hike in Lynn Headwaters Regional Park, but the view at the top makes it well worth it. This hike is often compared to the Grouse Grind, as it offers a great cardio workout, but is much less crowded. 

There are a few lookout points along the way that offer great views of Mount Seymour. The first one is about 3.4 km in, or about 30 minutes after leaving the Lynn Loop Trail. Here you will have a view across to Mount Seymour and to the Seymour River valley below.

To get to Lynn Peak, park at Lynn Headwaters and turn right on the gravel trail after the bridge over Lynn Creek. Follow the gravel for 10 minutes before turning left onto the Lynn Loop Trail. As you follow Lynn Loop upwards for another 10 minutes, look for the trailhead to Lynn Peak on your right.

2. Dog Mountain 

The Dog Mountain bluffs is a great hike to take on any given day, as it is only a 25 minute drive from downtown and it takes about 1 or 2 hours to complete. This is a short, easy hike from Mount Seymour that offers a spectacular view of Vancouver on a clear day. The trailhead begins just past the Bear’s Paw lodge at the far end of the Mount Seymour parking lot. 

From the parking lot, walk towards the BC Parks sign at the northwest corner. Walk north along the wide gravel trail for about 20 meters until you see a small sign and a trail that goes into the trees on your left.
Enter and walk down the small hill to the first bridge crossing a small stream. The trail makes its way around tree roots and through rocky areas staying relatively flat with only the occasional small hill. In the winter, the trail is nice snowshoe along.

3. St. Mark's Summit 

St Mark’s summit is an intermediate hike that starts by the Cypress Mountain day lodge. It winds 11 km along the Howe Sound Crest Trail. It takes about 5 hours to get to the summit and back.

From the Cypress Mountain downhill parking lot, head north towards the nearby chairlift and look for the Howe Sound Crest Trail sign. The trail follows alongside several ski runs until a sign that points to the right to the Howe Sound Crest Trail. Follow this trail uphill until it merges onto a wider ski run and veer to the left towards a large green water tower. Just before the tower, go right onto a trail and walk uphill through the trees.

4.    Garibaldi Lake 

It may be a tedious, 3-hour hike up to Garibaldi Lake, however, once you arrive, you will be absolutely blown away by the beauty of this incredible glacial lake. This hike can be completed in 1 day, but we definitely recommend spending a couple days at the campground located at the southern shore to really soak in the beauty and its surroundings. 

Accessible from the Rubble Creek parking lot just south of Whistler, the hike begins at the wooden steps along the top section of the parking lot. We highly recommend checking out this incredible location this summer! 

5. BCMC 

Right beside the popular, “Grouse Grind”, this trail is just as challenging and thrilling. From the Grouse Grind trail head, follow the trail straight, instead of veering left to the grind. Look for the black ‘BCMC’ signage then follow the red flags all the way up. BCMC is steep, rooty, and rocky so remember to wear good runners or hiking shoes. 

The trail is approximately 10 minutes longer than the grind, but you end up finishing at the same spot. Depending on how tired you are once you reach the top, you have the option to take the gondola back down, or if you’re feeling extra motivated, you can take the same BCMC back down! 

 

There you have it! Five of the best hikes that you can do in a day or less in Vancouver! Happy hiking! Let us know in the comments below if you have any other suggestions that we should try out this summer!